Category Archives: Rule 41(g) / Return of property

W.D.Ark.: Def counsel has apparent authority to receive property returned after arrest

In a civil action for return of property: “In the specific context of the disposition of property, district courts have found that the government acts appropriately when it disposes of property in a manner consistent with actions or representations made … Continue reading

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D.Nev.: Govt responds it won’t use evidence seized at trial so motion for return of property or to suppress granted

The government seized defendant’s iPad and but didn’t search it because they didn’t have a password. Finally, they decided not to attempt to use it as evidence, so the motion for return of property is granted. The government didn’t intend … Continue reading

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OH2: Property can’t be returned when it still has evidentiary value

“There was little evidence regarding the floppy disks, CDs, and Rolodex, but the burden was on Webber to demonstrate that she was entitled to their return. Upon review of the record, the evidence before the trial court supported a conclusion … Continue reading

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E.D.Cal.: No right to return of iPad and iPhone as long as they have evidentiary value, including through appeal

Defendant does not have a right to return of seized property under Rule 41(g) as long as there is potential evidentiary value, including through appeal. Defendant does not claim that his iPad and iPhone weren’t illegally seized to begin with; … Continue reading

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E.D.Tenn.: When state officers seize and hold property in federal case, return of property under Rule 41(g) not possible

State officers obtained a search warrant for defendant’s property which they held but was being used in a federal prosecution. Rule 41(g) does not enable the defendant to get return of property held by state officials even though there is … Continue reading

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C.D.Cal.: Limited motion for return of property doesn’t prevent transfer from feds to state; privilege issues can still be litigated later

The petitioner moved for return of property, seized computer information, under Rule 41(g) for purposes of conducting business. The government moved to transfer the information to state authorities for their own investigation. The fact there is a potential attorney-client privilege … Continue reading

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D.Kan.: Rule 41(g) requires there be no adequate remedy at law; here there is one, so denied

The government didn’t seize $15,000 at issue here: It allegedly told counsel to hold on to it, and that’s in the District of Kansas. This is the wrong forum and there’s an adequate remedy at law, so the Rule 41(g) … Continue reading

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CA6: Rule 41(g) motion for return of property doesn’t lie in federal court when state officers seized, even in a federal prosecution

Rule 41(g) motion for return of property requires that officers of the federal government have seized it. Where state and local authorities seized the property, a 41(g) motion doesn’t lie in federal court. United States v. Price, 2016 U.S. App. … Continue reading

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NE: Def is presumptively entitled to return of noncontraband property seized from him when his case is over

Defendant is presumptively entitled to return of noncontraband property seized from him when his case is over. “As in State v. Agee, supra, we conclude that once the criminal proceedings against Dubray were concluded, Dubray was presumptively entitled to the … Continue reading

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OH: Court couldn’t order return of property where statute gave executive branch discretion to not return

A warrant was issued to permit ODA officers to enter property to look for wild animals being kept there. The warrant did not require seizure but referred to the statute that vests that discretion in the Director. The judge thus … Continue reading

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