Category Archives: Reasonable expectation of privacy

MA: Removing paint chips off a car under the automobile exception was reasonable

There was probable cause that defendant’s car was involved in a shooting such that its stop and search was reasonable under the automobile exception. That included removing paint chips from it when it had been removed to the police station. … Continue reading

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NYTimes: Can 30,000 Cameras Help Solve Chicago’s Crime Problem?

NYTimes: Can 30,000 Cameras Help Solve Chicago’s Crime Problem? By Timothy Williams Armed with advanced gadgets and mapping, officers can get to crime scenes “in time to see the guy still shooting.” But what does it mean for residents’ privacy? … Continue reading

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W.D.Tex.: Stop for jaywalking in high crime area didn’t provide RS to detain to ask about drugs; removing key fob from pocket was 4A violation

Reasonable suspicion for jaywalking didn’t permit questioning about drugs just because defendant was in a high crime area. The use of defendant’s key fob in his pocket violated the Fourth Amendment, following United States v. Craddock, 841 F.3d 756, 760 … Continue reading

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E.D.Mich.: Def was essentially and admittedly an “innocent bystander” at the place searched and had no standing

This defendant had no standing in the condo that was searched under a search warrant. He produced nothing to show that he had any connection to the property or was a guest with a connection to the premises, even an … Continue reading

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Daily Beast: Justices Thomas and Gorsuch Just Hinted They Would End Privacy as We Know It

Daily Beast: Justices Thomas and Gorsuch Just Hinted They Would End Privacy as We Know It by Jay Michaelson: President Trump’s addition to the Supreme Court sides with the bench’s ‘originalist’—and it has terrifying implications for your rights. Because privacy … Continue reading

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SCOTUS: The driver of a rental car not on the contract may have a REP in the car

The driver of a rental car not listed on the contract may have a reasonable exception of privacy in the car Byrd v. United States, 2018 U.S. LEXIS 2803 (May 14, 2018). Syllabus:

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W.D.Tex.: Removal of def’s key fob to press the buttons to locate car was a search that violated a REP in def’s pants pocket

The removal of defendant’s key fob from his pocket to locate his car violated a reasonable expectation of privacy and required suppression of the identity of his car. United States v. Fennell, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 77041 (W.D. Tex, May … Continue reading

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NY1: REP in a bathroom with door closed but unlocked

A person in a bathroom without a lock on the door with the door shut has a reasonable expectation of privacy. Police opening the door violated that expectation. People v. Vinson, 2018 NY Slip Op 03437, 2018 N.Y. App. Div. … Continue reading

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CA11: Interrupted residential burglary is exigency for police entry and search

“Police officers interrupt what they reasonably believe to be a residential burglary and detain two suspects just outside the house. Having done so, can the officers thereafter lawfully enter the home—without a warrant, and without further suspicion of wrongdoing—to briefly … Continue reading

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Or: Officers didn’t violate def’s privacy by looking under bathroom stall door to see him masturbating

Officers did not violate defendant’s privacy rights in looking under the door from 5′ away to see that he was masturbating and ordering him out. The officers’ look violated no “social norms or [did it] significantly impair defendant’s interest in … Continue reading

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MO: Recording def’s conversation with attorney in police station interview room violated 6A and privilege; mandamus granted against unsealing

Defendant’s attorney met him at the police station to confer, and they put them in an interview room which recorded their meeting. The trial court appointed a special master to review it. The recording violated defendant’s attorney-client privilege and right … Continue reading

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WaPo: Va. Supreme Court revives challenge to police storage of license plate reader data

WaPo: Va. Supreme Court revives challenge to police storage of license plate reader data by Tom Jackman:

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