Category Archives: Exclusionary rule

IL sustains arrest for firearm where statute authorizing arrest was later declared unconstitutional

Defendant was stopped under a statute later declared unconstitutional. Distinguishing prior authorities applying state law, the court holds that the “void ab initio” doctrine does not apply here, and the arrest, valid at the time, did not require suppression of … Continue reading

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TX9: Texas provides no exclusionary remedy for illegal search and seizure in forfeiture cases

Texas provides no exclusionary remedy for illegal search and seizure in forfeiture cases. $102,450.00 in United States Currency v. State, 2017 Tex. App. LEXIS 5761 (Tex. App. – Beaumont June 22, 2017):

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Mapp v. Ohio decided 56 years ago today

Mapp v. Ohio, 367 U.S. 643 (1961), on application of the exclusionary rule to the states decided 56 years ago today. Ironically, the exclusionary rule issue wasn’t even argued in the briefs, as noted by the dissent, id. at 676-77. … Continue reading

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Hudson gutted the knock-and-announce rule by making it purely optional 11 years ago today

Hudson v. Michigan, 547 U.S. 586 (2006), decided 11 years ago today, unraveling the knock-and-announce rule of Wilson v. Arkansas (1995) and Richards v. Wisconsin (1997). It’s constitutionally required, it saves lives, it’s far more civil in a civil society, … Continue reading

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CA7: Exclusionary rule won’t be applied to identity in an illegal reentry case

The exclusionary rule won’t be applied to suppress the identity of an undocumented person leading to illegal reentry prosecution (relying on Hudson). United States v. Chagoya-Morales, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 10277 (7th Cir. June 9, 2017):

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TN: TN SCt has to adopt Herring under exclusionary rule; Ct.Crim.App. can’t

Despite the Tennessee Supreme Court’s recent changes in exclusionary rule jurisprudence, the court has not yet adopted Herring on good faith reliance on an out of date list. This court will not do it–that court has to. State v. McElrath, … Continue reading

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Texas finally adopts the Davis good faith exception to its statutory exclusionary rule

Texas finally adopts the Davis good faith exception to its statutory exclusionary rule to a pre-Jardines dog sniff in a wide ranging and scholarly opinion surveying all the federal circuits on Davis and attenuation. McClintock v. State, 2017 Tex. Crim. … Continue reading

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S.D.W.Va.: Flagrant violation of 4A with warrantless GPS on def’s car doesn’t get suppressed because of def’s lack of standing at time of search

The police flagrantly violated the Fourth Amendment by placing a GPS device on a car without a warrant. Defendant was the target, but he’d sold and relinquished control of the car to another days later by the time of the … Continue reading

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D.Conn.: Protective weapons search of nightstand for a weapon invalid where def removed from house in handcuffs

The court does not believe an officer who claimed to have seen crack cocaine in a black opaque drawstring bag that was closed in the first search of his person. The court also does not believe that a much later … Continue reading

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AZ: Non-consensual blood draw DUI provision is unconstitutional as applied, but the Davis GFE applies

Non-consensual blood draw DUI provision is unconstitutional as applied, but the Davis good faith exception applies here. Defendant was airlifted to a Nevada hospital for the blood draw. The trial court didn’t make findings on whether Nevada or Arizona law … Continue reading

Posted in Consent, Drug or alcohol testing, Exclusionary rule, Reasonable suspicion | Comments Off