Category Archives: Third Party Doctrine

Gizmodo: ‘Gap’ in App Store Rules Endangers Reproductive Data, [only 9] Top Law Enforcement Chiefs Say

Gizmodo: ‘Gap’ in App Store Rules Endangers Reproductive Data, Top Law Enforcement Chiefs Say by Dell Cameron (“Attorneys general in nine states and the District of Columbia are urging Apple this week to introduce new App Store requirements designed to … Continue reading

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WaPo: Google reaches record $392M privacy settlement over location data

WaPo: Google reaches record $392M privacy settlement over location data by Bryan Pietsch (“Google agreed to pay $391.5 million to 40 states to settle an investigation into its location tracking practices, a coalition of state attorneys general announced Monday. The … Continue reading

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MA: Def not prejudiced by third party’s response to SW

A third party in possession of Medicaid records was served with a search warrant, and appellant complains of the procedural nature of the third party’s response. [Aside from no standing,] Appellant doesn’t even attempt to show that the exclusionary rule … Continue reading

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E.D.N.Y.: Rental car GPS data not comparable to CSLI; it’s just third-party information

Rental car location tracking is significantly different from CSLI. It is purely third-party information. Moreover, the rental car company consented to the taking of the information. United States v. Brown, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 166119 (E.D.N.Y. Sept. 14, 2022). The … Continue reading

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E.D.Tenn.: Walmart Pay records do not require SW

A search warrant isn’t needed for investigators to access information from Walmart Pay. Carpenter doesn’t apply. United States v. Whipple, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 153126 (E.D. Tenn. Aug. 25, 2022). A claim that the officer presented false information to get … Continue reading

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CA1: Suit v. IRS for third-party records retention might state claim, remanded

The taxpayer’s third-party financial records suit was not barred by the Anti-Injunction Act. It was not against collection of a tax, but the government retaining records. Remanded to consider other issues as well. Harper v. Rettig, 2022 U.S. App. LEXIS … Continue reading

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CA9: Mandated GPS tracking of e-scooters not 4A violation

The City of Los Angeles e-scooter ordinance requires the scooters to have GPS and provide real time tracking information. This is classic third-party data, and there is no reasonable expectation of privacy of scooter users in that information. Sanchez v. … Continue reading

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Reason: Houston Says Businesses Must Install Surveillance Cameras and Cops Can View Footage Without a Warrant

Reason: Houston Says Businesses Must Install Surveillance Cameras and Cops Can View Footage Without a Warrant by Elizabeth Nolan Brown:

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M.D.Tenn.: Copies of what were notarized kept by the notary are third-party records

Defendant had documents notarized at a Nashville law office where the practice of the lawyer-notary, not required by law, to copy what was notarized, and they did it for free. The government found out about it and subpoenaed the records. … Continue reading

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CA3: Bank records still have no REP under Carpenter

Defendant’s bank records were subject to the third-party doctrine which was not changed by Carpenter. United States v. Hall, 2022 U.S. App. LEXIS 6425 (3d Cir. Mar. 14, 2022):

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CA1: Third-party doctrine applies to prescription drug monitoring program

This is an action to enforce a DEA administrative subpoena to the New Hampshire Prescription Drug Monitoring Program for specific prescriptions. The court declines to equate prescription records with other medical records because the pharmacy industry is closely regulated. It … Continue reading

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New York Daily News: Is our government buying our data? We need a federal investigation.

New York Daily News: Is our government buying our data? We need a federal investigation. by Elizabeth Holtzman and Mark Udall (Nov. 18, 2021) (“Tech companies, eager to sell us ads, promise to anonymize any of our shared data, a … Continue reading

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Crypto currency now subject to 26 U.S.C. § 6050i reporting like cash. Any 4A implications? No.

See Quartz: The infrastructure bill makes crypto tax-reporting failures a felony by Scott Nover. Cryptocurrency is added in to 26 U.S.C. § 6050i on cash or cash equivalent transactions. The writer poses a Fourth Amendment question: The requirements could violate … Continue reading

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Cato: Why Don’t Americans Have Stronger Financial Privacy Rights?

Cato: Why Don’t Americans Have Stronger Financial Privacy Rights? by Nicholas Anthony (“The announcement that the Biden administration proposed a $600 (now $10,000) threshold for bank account surveillance has left many people on social media wondering how such a proposal … Continue reading

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W.D.Pa.: Warrantless production of state ALPR data to FBI not governed by Carpenter

The FBI requested the state search its Automated License Plate Reader database for defendant’s LPN to trace the movement of his car. Carpenter simply cannot be made to apply to ALPR data. 106 records were found. United States v. Bowers, … Continue reading

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E.D.Wash.: No REP in an ISP’s mere subscriber records

There is no reasonable expectation of privacy in an ISP’s mere subscriber records. “The Government points out that it received Defendant’s name, address and telephone number as the subscriber of the subject IP address, but did not request or receive … Continue reading

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Ocala Post: Biden wants IRS to snoop into your bank account, know when you have $600 or more; some bankers say it violates the 4A (but it doesn’t)

Ocala Post: Biden wants IRS to snoop into your bank account, know when you have $600 or more (“Outraged citizens and banks alike want to know why President Joe Biden plans to allow the IRS to snoop into bank accounts, … Continue reading

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CA7: Pen register to track IP address in cyberattack investigation governed by third-party doctrine and not Carpenter

The use of a pen register order to track IP address in cyberattack investigation governed by third-party doctrine and not Carpenter. United States v. Soybel, 19-1936 (7th Cir. Sept. 8, 2021):

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S.D.Ind.: IU’s CrimsonCard key card system has no REP in user movements

Indiana University’s CrimsonCard, a key card, that tracks movement into University buildings and facilities, does not carry a reasonable expectation of privacy. This case arose from an investigation of a hazing incident, and the University was corroborating alleged alibis. There … Continue reading

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Raw Story: Mo Brooks bellyaches about Congress seizing his phone records: ‘They should not have access to anything’

Raw Story: Mo Brooks bellyaches about Congress seizing his phone records: ‘They should not have access to anything’ by David Edwards:

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