Category Archives: Privileges

Cal.1: California juries may be instructed on refusal of consent to blood draw and insisting on a SW as evidence of guilt

“The question presented here is this: If, following a valid arrest for such an offense, a motorist refuses to cooperate in the taking of a blood test unless a warrant is first obtained, may the jury at the motorist’s ensuing … Continue reading

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D.Utah: An A-C communication seized that was still in the hands of the taint team was not a 4A or 6A violation

An attorney-client letter was obtained by search warrant and it was isolated by the taint team. Because no case was pending at the time, the Sixth Amendment was not violated, and the dismissal or disqualification is an necessary remedy. United … Continue reading

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NY1: Evidence of failing to open door when police are there with a SW doesn’t violate 4A

“Defendant did not preserve his claim that the admission of evidence that he did not open the door when the police knocked to show his consciousness of guilt violating his Fourth Amendment rights and his right to a fair trial … Continue reading

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IA: Court ordered privilege review of search was at its expense

When the court orders privilege review for the results of a search, it’s a court expense. State v. Iowa District Court for Emmet County, 2024 Iowa Sup. LEXIS 52 (May 10, 2024). “Lenhart does not assert fraud on the court, … Continue reading

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CO adopts Graham for state excessive force claims

Colorado adopts the Graham v. Connor standard for excessive force under state law. Plaintiff stated enough to overcome a motion to dismiss. Woodall v. Godfrey, 2024 COA 42 (Apr. 25, 2024).* “Scafidi’s ‘seizure’ was not unreasonable, because his arrest was … Continue reading

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CA5: Deficient privilege log after records search was waiver

After voluminous records were seized with a warrant, defendant’s privilege log was deficient to identify who and what, and that was treated as waiver. United States v. Fluitt, 2024 U.S. App. LEXIS 9983 (5th Cir. Apr. 24, 2024). Defendant was … Continue reading

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OR: Police listening to attorney-client jail calls because attorney calls not properly segregated leads to dismissal of some counts and setting aside guilty plea

The jail computer controlled phone system did not properly block attorney-client telephone calls, and the police listened to defense counsel’s conversations with defendant in jail. The police then used that information to supersede the indictment. Prejudice is presumed. State v. … Continue reading

Posted in Administrative search, Burden of pleading, Prison and jail searches, Privileges, Standing | Comments Off on OR: Police listening to attorney-client jail calls because attorney calls not properly segregated leads to dismissal of some counts and setting aside guilty plea

CA6: Asking def before a patdown during arrest what he had on him wasn’t barred by Miranda

Asking defendant before a patdown during arrest what he had on him wasn’t barred by Miranda. United States v. Lester, 2024 U.S. App. LEXIS 9162 (6th Cir. Apr. 16, 2024). The evidence supports the trial court’s conclusion defendant consented to … Continue reading

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CA9: Compelled use of fingerprint to open a cell phone didn’t violate 5A

Police forcing defendant parolee to use his fingerprint to open his cell phone was not testimonial under the Fifth Amendment. It was “cognitive exertion” and akin to taking DNA or a blood draw. United States v. Payne, 2024 U.S. App. … Continue reading

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S.D.N.Y.: GJ subpoena for cell phone passcode quashed.

The government’s grand jury subpoena for defendant’s cell phone passcode is quashed because it seeks testimonial information in violation of the Fifth Amendment showing defendant’s knowledge of the contents of the phone. “The Court denies Gray’s Rule 41(g) motion. Even … Continue reading

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S.D.N.Y.: There’s a privacy interest in a cell phone passcode, but its disclosure here under a ruse does not lead to suppression

There is a privacy interest in one’s cell phone passode protected by the Fifth Amendment. Here, however, defendant’s disclosure of the passcode in responding to a CBP ruse after a flight from Mexico was not compulsion. United States v. Shvartsman, … Continue reading

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OH1: Missing notary seal on SW affidavit not an error of constitutional magnitude, so no suppression

A search warrant isn’t void because the affidavit in support was missing a notary seal. The rest of the statutory requirements were satisfied, and this wasn’t an error of constitutional magnitude. State v. Whittle, 2024-Ohio-1023,2024 Ohio App. LEXIS 958 (1st … Continue reading

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NJ: State could get SW for bullet removed during surgery even four years after shooting

Defendant had elective surgery four years after a shooting to remove the bullet. The police were entitled to a search warrant for the bullet from the hospital because it was evidence of a crime. Trial court’s denial of the warrant … Continue reading

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D.Minn.: Cell phone that govt can’t open not in its possession for discovery purposes

Defendant’s cell phone is in the possession of the government but it can’t search it because they don’t have the pass code. Defendant’s request for discovery of the phone under Rule 16 is denied because the contents of the phone … Continue reading

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D.N.M.: Accidental finding of A-C communications in cell phone search was not intentional and did not compromise defendant’s Sixth Amendment right to counsel

Defendant’s Apple cell phone was searched with a warrant, and the contents were shared with defense counsel even before the government completed its own review. It was discovered that there were attorney-client communications on the phone, and the government immediately … Continue reading

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D.Mass.: Inevitable discovery applies to def giving up passcode to cell phone

Inevitable discovery applies to defendant giving up the passcode to his cell phone by a statement he challenged. The government had an independent basis to get into the phone to search it. United States v. Xiaolei Wu, 2024 U.S. Dist. … Continue reading

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techdirt: Every Major Pharmacy Chain Is Giving The Government Warrantless Access To Medical Records

techdirt: Every Major Pharmacy Chain Is Giving The Government Warrantless Access To Medical Records by Tim Cushing:

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Cal.6: SW for fingerprint to unlock cell phone wasn’t unreasonable under 4A or testimonial compulsion under 5A

The officers here got a search warrant which required defendant to submit to unlocking his cell phone with his fingerprint. They opened the phone, but then it locked and they needed a second warrant to unlock it again. The affidavit … Continue reading

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UT: Prosecutor’s trial comment on def’s refusal to give passcode to phone violated 5A

Defendant refused to reveal the passcode to his cell phone, and the police never got into it. He was charged with kidnapping, and he claimed that there was no kidnapping and that she consented to come with him. At trial, … Continue reading

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D.P.R.: Cell phone records obtained by SW not self-authenticating as evidence under 902(11)

Cell phone records obtained by warrant are not self-authenticating under F.R.E. 902(11). More will be required. United States v. Charbonier-Laureano, 2023 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 218249 (D.P.R. Dec. 5, 2023). The government’s knowledge fraud co-conspirators communicated by cell phone during period … Continue reading

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