Category Archives: Consent

CA9: Mandated GPS tracking of e-scooters not 4A violation

The City of Los Angeles e-scooter ordinance requires the scooters to have GPS and provide real time tracking information. This is classic third-party data, and there is no reasonable expectation of privacy of scooter users in that information. Sanchez v. … Continue reading

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E.D.Mich.: Def had standing in his brother’s garage where only they had keys and it was used for business purposes

The warrantless search of defendant’s brother’s garage where both had keys and defendant kept things from their construction business was unreasonable. Defendant had standing because it was used for business purposes, and he did not have to spend the night … Continue reading

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NJ: Visitor had standing in his own stuff, even if not the place

A visitor had standing to contest the search of his own stuff while he was there. (And the alleged consent of his mother was suspect.) State v. Marcellus, 2022 N.J. Super. LEXIS 67 (May 18, 2022). Defendant was stopped for … Continue reading

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N.D.Ill.: Alleged violation of police dept policy on consent didn’t affect 4A claim here

The defense claim the officer somehow violated department policy in obtaining consent doesn’t bear on the constitutional question at all. There was at least reasonable suspicion for his stop and the encounter. United States v. Lopez-Garcia, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS … Continue reading

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CA5: GFE applies to showing of nexus

The good faith exception applies to the warrant affidavit’s showing of nexus. The showing wasn’t great, but it was sufficient to not be bare bones. The officer adequately connected defendant to the premises. United States v. Jackson, 2022 U.S. App. … Continue reading

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W.D.Va.: Knock-and-announce isn’t required when no one home

Defense counsel wasn’t ineffective for not challenging execution of the search warrant without knocking and announcing. First, the homeowner wasn’t there; he was in the hospital. Second, Hudson doesn’t permit that challenge under the exclusionary rule. Brown v. Clarke, 2022 … Continue reading

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TN: Owner of premises could consent to enter room of visitor

Defendant was a suspect in a murder, and police were admitted to the house where he stayed by consent of the owner. He wouldn’t come out of his bedroom, so they went in. The owner had complete control over the … Continue reading

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E.D.Wis.: Admitted investigatory motive for inventory made it unreasonable

Officers had an admitted investigatory motive for stopping and searching defendant’s car. They found a reason to impound it and conduct an inventory, and that was unreasonable here. United States v. Clayton, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 80076 (E.D.Wis. May 3, … Continue reading

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CA2: Shot fired through wall justified entry into that locked room

“At the time they entered Laurent’s locked room, the officers knew that only minutes before a shot had been fired from the locked room into the neighboring room. The district court did not err, much less clearly err, in finding … Continue reading

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VI: Procedural errors in telephonic SW not suppressible without recklessness or bad faith

The procedural deficiencies in obtaining the telephonic warrants did not render them invalid. There was no showing of bad faith by the officers. People v. Glasford, 2022 VI SUPER 42, 2022 V.I. LEXIS 40 (Apr. 19, 2022). A person detained … Continue reading

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S.D.Miss.: 4A isn’t a basis to challenge federal marijuana criminalization

The Fourth Amendment provides no basis to claim that federal prosecution of marijuana cases violates the Constitution. United States v. Jones, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 73000 (S.D.Miss. Apr. 21, 2022).* The officer here had probable cause to arrest plaintiff for … Continue reading

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N.D.Ill.: Going to drug deal from house and then going back is nexus to the house

Defendant left his house, went to a drug deal, and returned. This is not the officer’s mere reliance on what drug dealers normally do or he would expect to find. United States v. McCreary, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 69838 (N.D.Ill. … Continue reading

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D.N.J.: Whether this state court judge could legally issue a telephonic warrant isn’t a 4A violation

Whether a lower court judge could issue a telephonic search warrant under state law doesn’t matter in federal court or the Fourth Amendment. “To begin with, the defendant raises at best a state-law technicality that is not of federal constitutional … Continue reading

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N.D.Ga.: No standing from hiding a gun and clip in the breakfast area of a hotel

Defendant has no standing to contest police finding his gun and clip he hid in separate cabinets in the breakfast area of his hotel. United States v. Blakely, 2022 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 59245 (N.D.Ga. Feb. 28, 2022),* adopted, 2022 U.S. … Continue reading

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OR: Asking juror question about refusal of consent was error, but here harmless

Oregon permits juror questions, and here one asked whether defendant willingly provided a DNA sample. Asking it on the record all amounted to error, but under plain error review, with other evidence in the case, it’s not reversible. State v. … Continue reading

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Bloomberg Law: Police Search of Rape Victims’ DNA Tests Meaning of Consent

Bloomberg Law: Police Search of Rape Victims’ DNA Tests Meaning of Consent by Lydia Wheeler:

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UT: Searching a sleeping driver unreasonable; not community caretaking function

The state’s justification of rousting a person sleeping in a car was a seizure and not justified by the community caretaking function. The state bore the burden, and it failed. This was treated by the officers as a criminal investigation … Continue reading

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W.D.Mich.: With no evidence to rebut the prosecution evidence def consented to search of his person, the govt met its burden of proof on consent

“In this case, Defendant expressly indicated that he does not dispute the validity of his consent, but solely the scope of that consent. Detective Fox testified that he asked for Defendant’s general consent to search his person and that Defendant … Continue reading

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SD: Refusal to submit to DUI blood draw, itself an offense, could be instructed upon without violating 4A

Where refusal to submit to a DUI blood test is the offense and statute makes refusal to submit admissible, it did not violate the Fourth Amendment to instruct the jury on refusal. State v. Nelson, 2022 SD 12, 2022 S.D. … Continue reading

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LA5: Motorist assist led to plain smell and valid search

Police were called for a motorist assist to unlock a car. Once opened, the car smelled of marijuana, and that created probable cause. The police were invited to the curtilage. State v. Keller, 2022 La. App. LEXIS 247 (La. App. … Continue reading

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